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Citing a report by the American Immigration Council detailing 36 examples of executive actons taken on immigration by every president since 1956, the Associated Press highlighted executive actions taken by Presidents Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush to shield immigrants from deportation.

Mark Noferi, Enforcement Fellow at the American Immigration Council, was also quoted in the article on the similarities between President Obama's possible executive order on immigration:

"It's a striking parallel," said Mark Noferi of the pro-immigration American Immigration Council. "Bush Sr. went big at the time. He protected about 40 percent of the unauthorized population. Back then that was up to 1.5 million. Today that would be about 5 million."

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Associated Press | 11/15/14

Highlighting data from the American Immigration Council's report "Executive Grants of Temporary Immigration Relief, 1956-Present" NBC News Latino covered the historical precedent of executive action on immigration in the article "Report: Since Eisenhower, Executive Action Used for Immigration":

When President Barack Obama takes executive action to make immigration reforms, he will be following the lead of several other presidents, an immigration group said in a recently released report.

The report by the American Immigration Council states that every U.S. president since at least 1956 has granted temporary immigration relief of some form.

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NBC News | 10/06/14

A New York Times article, "Border Agency Is Authorized to Open Criminal Inquiries," which details new measures implemented by the Department of Homeland Security to respond to accusations of abuse by border agents, features data from the American Immigration Council's report "No Action Taken: Lack of CBP Accountability in Responding to Complaints of Abuse':

"In recent months, the agency’s internal affairs officials have examined 876 cases raised in reports by the two groups, the Police Executive Research Forum and the American Immigration Council. Mark Morgan, the head of the internal affairs office, said 11 cases remained under criminal investigation by other agencies, while 155 cases had been reopened for further noncriminal review.

Some advocacy groups cautiously praised the new measures.

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New York Times | 09/18/14

Citing the American Immigration Council's "No Action Taken: Lack of CBP Accountability in Responding to Complaints of Abuse" report, the Los Angeles Times called for more transparency within the Customs and Border Protection agency.

The editorial titled "Customs and Border Protection's deadly force problem" states the agency must respond to complaints filed against agents with scrutiny and efficiency:

"The American Immigration Council reported in May that of 809 abuse complaints (a broader category) filed from 2009 to 2012, 40% remained unresolved, and in the resolved cases, only 3% found fault with an agent's actions. Comparative statistics are hard to come by, but a study of 2002 data found that about 8% of complaints against civilian police officers were sustained.

....

These are public employees doing the public's work. The default position should be transparency."

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Los Angeles Times | 09/16/14

The New York Times recently highlighted a lawsuit filed by the American Immigration Council and other groups challenging the governments policies of denying a fair deportation process to mothers and children who have fled extreme violence, death threats, rape, and persecution in Central America and come to the United States seeking safety.

The article states:

"The lawsuit, brought in Federal District Court in Washington, says that immigration authorities created a system to rush deportations from the temporary center holding about 600 mothers and their children in the isolated desert town of Artesia, N.M. The suit accuses officials of raising numerous legal and practical hurdles to discourage migrants from seeking asylum, after deciding in advance that few petitions would succeed.

'By locking up women and babies, the Obama administration has made it their mission to deport these people as quickly as possible,' said Marielena Hincapie, executive director of the National Immigration Law Center, one of the groups bringing the suit. 'Our message to the government is simple: Follow the law,' she said during a conference call with reporters. 'We must ensure that every person who interacts with our legal system has a fair hearing.'

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New York Times | 08/22/14

Mary Giovagnoli, Director of the Immigration Policy Center at the American Immigration Council, was recently quoted in a Caller Times article about efforts by Congress to revise the 2008 Trafficking Victims Protection Act (TVPA) in order to speed up the return process for unaccompanied children from Central America.

“I think the HUMANE Act is a little bit inaptly titled,” said Mary Giovagnoli, policy director at the American Immigration Council.

Giovagnoli said federal officials are likely telling children about the advantages of voluntary return and that if they don’t have any problems, they can just go home and won’t be detained.

“A lot of these Mexican kids are probably being voluntarily returned without having any full screening that they are required to get under law to see whether or not they are a trafficking victim,” Giovagnoli said.

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Caller Times | 07/30/14

Beth Werlin, Deputy Legal Director for the American Immigration Council, discusses the recent nationwide class-action lawsuit on behalf of thousands of children who are challenging the federal government's failure to provide them with legal representation as it carries out deportation hearings against them with EbruNews.

Watch the clip below.


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EbruNews | 07/11/14

On MSNBC, Benjamin Johnson, Executive Director of the American Immigration Council, pushes back against the idea that America should not protect children and women crossing the U.S.-Mexico border.

Watch the clip below.

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MSNBC | 07/05/14

The Immigration Policy Center's report "Two Years and Counting: Assessing the Growing Power of DACA" was cited in the NBC article "White House To Honor DACA Recipients As Champions of Change." The data from this report examines the gains made by DACA recipients over the two year since the program was announced.

"The Obama Administration issued deferred deportation as an executive order two years ago. Since that time tens of thousands of undocumented young immigrants known as DREAMers have applied and just recently became eligible to renew their two-year deportation deferments.

study released Monday by Harvard researchers Roberto Gonzálesand Angie M. Bautista-Chavez for the American Immigration Council found almost 60 percent of deferred deportation (DACA) recipients surveyed had been able to obtain new jobs, 45 percent had increased their earnings, and almost six-in-ten had obtained driver's licenses, broadening education and employment options."

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NBC | 06/16/14

The New York Times published an editorial calling for more transparency within Customs and Border Protection based on the Immigration Policy Center's report "No Action Taken: Lack of CBP Accountability in Responding to Complaints of Abuse".

The editorial stated: "If a Border Patrol agent beats, kicks, threatens or otherwise abuses you, you can file a complaint. What you can’t count on, evidently, is anything being done about it.

That is the sorry conclusion of a study released last week by the American Immigration Council, an advocacy organization in Washington. The council sought to collect data about abuse complaints against the Border Patrol — a difficult task, given the lack of transparency at Customs and Border Protection, the agency within the Department of Homeland Security to which the Border Patrol belongs.

The council had to sue under the Freedom of Information Act to obtain records of 809 complaints between January 2009 and January 2012. The accusations varied widely — of migrants kicked and stomped after being detained, struck in the face and head with flashlights and other objects, sexually groped, improperly strip-searched, verbally abused."

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New York Times | 05/11/14