Skip to Content


The Council In the News

Explainer thanks Cheryl David of the American Immigration Lawyers Association, Benjamin Johnson of the American Immigration Council, Audrey Singer of the Brookings Institution, and Jessica Vaughan of the Center for Immigration Studies.

Slate | 07/29/10

The Immigration Policy Center, based in the nation's capital, pulled together immigration data from a variety of sources. Then it released fact sheets for all 50 states.

The center's Wendy Sefsaf says the study concludes that, if all undocumented workers were booted out of the Northwest immediately, the economic impact would be huge.

NPR - KPLU | 07/29/10

Now, unless a federal judge decides otherwise, law enforcement officers will be required starting Thursday to check the status of anyone they have “reasonable suspicion” to be in the United States illegally.

In a report released this month by the Immigration Policy Center in Washington, D.C., an Arizona attorney voiced concerns about how the law could be interpreted and carried out throughout the state.

East Valley Tribune | 07/28/10

"Immigrants are less likely to commit crimes than native-born citizens," said Ben Johnson, executive director of the American Immigration Council.

Johnson said the share of immigrants in federal prisons may seem alarming but that only 8 percent of all U.S. prisoners are in such facilities. Most are in state and local prisons, where incarceration rates for immigrants are lower than average.

He also pointed out that many immigrants in the federal system may simply be there because they lack legal immigration status -- not for having committed flagrant criminal offenses.

"No community is immune from the ravages of drugs and sexual violence. But the overwhelming majority of those crimes are not done by immigrants," Johnson said. "We don't ask criminals about their political affiliation or their religion. So why should we focus on their immigration status?"

ABC News | 07/28/10

Of course, that’s not counting illegal immigrants — DHS estimated 10.8 people were living in the U.S. illegally in 2009. But advocates of higher quotas argue that increasing the number of people who could legally enter the U.S. would also decrease illegal immigration. “We have a fundamental problem as a country accepting the idea that we need immigration numbers,” Mary Giovagnoli, director of Immigration Policy Center told TWI. “If we had a legal immigration system that worked, it would reduce the incentive for illegal immigration.”

Washington Independent | 07/28/10

"The consensus from most of my colleagues is that it probably will go to the Supreme Court," said Mo Goldman, an immigration attorney in Tucson, Ariz., and a board member of the American Immigration Council.

AIC's Goldman, who applauded the decision, conceded the law was popular but said a backlash "remains to be seen."

"I think the majority of people just want to see our immigration system fixed by Congress and maybe this law ... will put additional pressure on Congress to get the job done, finally," he said.

Investors Business Daily | 07/28/10

The Immigration Policy Center on Wednesday released its complete series of 50 state fact sheets which highlight the political and economic power of immigrants, Latinos and Asians in every state of the union.

Here are the results for how immigrants affect Idaho.

Sun Valley Online | 07/28/10

Seeking to insert "fact into a fact-free debate" about immigration, the Immigration Policy Center Wednesday unveiled statistical data for all 50 states highlighting Latino and Asian immigrants' political and economic power in American life.

"Facts are sadly lacking in the immigration debate," Mary Giovagnoli, director of the center, a pro-immigrant research and policy arm of the American Immigration Council, said in a conference call with reporters.

The policy center, based in Washington, D.C., compiled "fact sheets" for all 50 states and the District of Columbia from academic studies and government databases. They can be found at

Newsday | 07/28/10

An immigration think tank in Washington Wednesday released a report showing the impact of immigrants on the nation and individual states.

The Immigration Policy Center said its complete series of 50 state fact sheets highlight the political and economic power of immigrants, Latinos and Asians in every state of the union, who account for large and growing shares of the U.S. economy and electorate.

Overall, immigrants made up more than 12 percent of the U.S. population, or nearly 38 million people, in 2008, the report said.

United Press International | 07/28/10

You don't have to be an evangelical Christian to realize that immigration reform is in the U.S.'s self-interest. According to a report earlier this year from the Campaign for American Progress and the American Immigration Council, an amnesty program affecting the more than 11 million undocumented people in the United States would add $1.5 trillion to the GDP over a decade. That's a lot more folks generating government revenue and keeping U.S. businesses afloat.

Huffington Post | 07/27/10